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Removing Pesticides & Bacteria from your food with electrolysis:

HowDoes it?work

If getting rid of all the chemicals and pathogens from your food with some tap water and one little device sounds too good to be true, well, it is.

But if removing up to 99.99% of them sounds like something worth doing, well, we’ve got some good news for you.

Crop DeTox was designed to bring the cleaning power of nature into your kitchen, with a little help from science.

No harsh chemicals or rummaging around in your pantry for extra bicarb or white vinegar.

HOW does it work?
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WHY is it so important?
RESEARCH & FAQs
LAB TEST RESULTS

Electrolysis of water is the decomposition of water (H2O) into oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2) due to an electric current being passed through the water.

This results in the creation of oxygen rich water (hypochlorous acid HOCI), hydrogen rich water (sodium hydroxide NaOH) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH)

Between them, they can kill microbes, destroy pathogens and breakdown toxic chemicals and pesticides.

Foodborne Illness & Pesticide Related Health Concerns

We have an estimated 4.1 million cases of foodborne illness and disease every year in Australia. That’s around 31,000 hospitalisations, 1 million visits to doctors and 86 deaths.

It’s caused by consuming contaminated food, and while anyone can be infected with it, infants, elderly, people with suppressed immune systems and pregnant women are more susceptible to it.

What Do The Studies Say?

There have been many studies conducted around the world into the efficacy of this technology to reduce foodborne illness and reduce the consumption of toxins from our food.

We’ve included the findings from some of these studies below, as well as the results from testing our Crop DeTox for some of the most common foodborne pathogens and pesticides.

The Results Are In

We tested our Crop DeTox for some of the most common foodborne pathogens and pesticides.

Check out the results:

Commercial Grade Cleaning - in YOUR HOME KITCHEN

Commercial kitchens follow a 3 sink system to reduce the risk of handling and serving contaminated food.

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1) Electrolysed Cleaning Water

Most pesticides are oil based to prevent them from washing off when it rains, so tap water alone will not remove the pesticides.

This hydrogen rich water is a de greasing agent to break up those oils so they can be washed away.

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2) Electrolysed Disinfectant Water

This oxygen rich water, AKA hypochlorous acid, is the same exact germicide that our own white blood cells produce (our neutrophils) and disinfects the produce.

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3) Clean Water

To rinse away what has been lifted off the produce.

Video: How does the 3 sink system protect vendors and customers in restaurants and commercial kitchens?

3 Research & Results

Are there any studies into whether electrolysis actually works to clean produce?

There have been many studies conducted around the world into the efficacy of this technology to reduce foodborne illness and the consumption of toxins from our food.

We’ve summarised some of the studies we’re familiar with below to answer common FAQs on the topic. We’ve also included links and references to those reports for your convenience.

How do we know it removes pesticides?

Title: Reduction of Pesticide Residues on Fresh Vegetables with Electrolyzed Water Treatment

Authors: Jianxiong Hao, Wuyundalai, Haijie Liu, Tianpeng Chen, Yanxin Zhou, Yi-Cheng Su, and Lite Li

Abstract: The study investigates the degradation of three pesticides (acephate, omethoate, and dimethyl dichloroviny phosphate [DDVP]) using electrolyzed water. It demonstrates that electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) and electrolyzed reducing (ER) water effectively reduce pesticide residues on vegetables, specifically spinach, cabbage, and leek, without affecting the Vitamin C content of the vegetables.

Keywords: Electrolyzed water, food safety, pesticide residues, vegetables

Introduction:

  • Background: Increased consumption of fresh produce has led to concerns over pesticide residues.
  • Problem: Conventional methods like washing with tap water or detergent are not effective in removing pesticide residues.
  • Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of EO and ER water in reducing pesticide residues on fresh vegetables.

Materials and Methods:

  • Electrolyzed Water Preparation:
    • EO water: pH 2.3, ORP 1170 mV, available chlorine concentration (ACC) 70 mg/L.
    • ER water: pH 11.6, ORP -860 mV.
  • Vegetables Tested: Spinach, cabbage, and leek.
  • Pesticide Application: Vegetables were contaminated with acephate, omethoate, or DDVP solutions.
  • Treatment: Vegetables were soaked in EO or ER water for 30 minutes, and the pesticide residues were analyzed using gas chromatography.

Results:

  • Reduction of Pesticide Residues on Spinach:
    • Acephate: Reduced by 74% (EO) and 86% (ER).
    • Omethoate: Reduced by 62% (EO) and 75% (ER).
    • DDVP: Reduced by 59% (EO) and 46% (ER).
  • Comparison with Other Methods:
    • Tap water: Reduced residues by 22% (acephate), 15% (omethoate), and 18% (DDVP).
    • Detergent: Reduced residues by 54% (acephate), 10% (omethoate), and 23% (DDVP).
  • Effect on Vitamin C: No significant loss of Vitamin C was observed in spinach treated with EO or ER water.

Discussion:

  • Effectiveness: EO and ER water are more effective in reducing pesticide residues compared to tap water or detergent.
  • Mechanism: The high ORP of EO water and the cleaning properties of ER water are effective in breaking down pesticide residues.
  • Nutritional Impact: Using EO and ER water does not result in a loss of nutrients like Vitamin C.

Conclusion:

The study concludes that washing fresh vegetables with EO or ER water significantly reduces pesticide residues without affecting their nutritional value, presenting a potential method for enhancing food safety.

References:

  • The paper cites several studies on the use of electrolyzed water and its effectiveness in reducing pathogens and pesticide residues, supporting the findings of this study.

Critical Reading Method: Key Concept Clarity

  1. Main Idea: The study investigates the effectiveness of electrolyzed water (both EO and ER) in reducing pesticide residues on fresh vegetables.
  2. Supporting Concepts:
    • Electrolyzed water can effectively degrade common pesticides like acephate, omethoate, and DDVP.
    • EO and ER water treatments are more effective than traditional methods like washing with tap water or detergent.
    • The treatment does not adversely affect the nutritional content (Vitamin C) of the vegetables.
  3. Implications:
    • This method can be a practical application in food safety to ensure the consumption of pesticide-free fresh produce.
    • Further research is needed to explore the degradation mechanisms and the impact on other nutrients.

For further details, you can access the full paper here, and view our lab test results for pesticide removal rate here.

How do we know it kills bacteria?

1. Effectiveness of Electrolyzed Oxidizing (EO) Water for Inactivating Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enteritidis

Authors: Park, C.M., Hung, Y.C., and Kim, C.
Journal: Journal of Food Protection, 2001

Abstract:
This study evaluates the effectiveness of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water in inactivating foodborne pathogens on food contact surfaces. EO water, characterized by a high oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) and the presence of hypochlorous acid, was tested against Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enteritidis. Results showed that EO water achieved a reduction of 99.9% in Listeria monocytogenes, 99.8% in Escherichia coli O157:H7, and 99.9% in Salmonella enteritidis within 30 seconds of application. The study highlights EO water as a highly effective sanitizer for enhancing food safety.

2. Inactivation of Foodborne Pathogens on the Surface of Tomatoes by Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water

Authors: Kim, C., Hung, Y.C., and Brackett, R.E.
Journal: Journal of Food Protection, 2000

Abstract:
The research investigates the use of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water to inactivate foodborne pathogens on the surface of tomatoes. EO water, known for its high ORP and hypochlorous acid content, was applied to tomatoes contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. The treatment resulted in a reduction of E. coli O157:H7 by 98.7% and Salmonella spp. by 99.1% within 10 minutes. This study demonstrates the potential of EO water as an effective method for sanitizing fresh produce, ensuring consumer safety.

3. Antimicrobial Effect of Electrolyzed Oxidizing Water Against Bacterial Pathogens on Fresh Produce

Authors: Allende, A., McEvoy, J., Tao, Y., Luo, Y.
Journal: Food Control, 2009

Abstract:
This study assesses the antimicrobial properties of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water on fresh produce contaminated with foodborne pathogens. EO water was tested against a range of bacteria, including Salmonella and Escherichia coli. The results indicated that EO water reduced Salmonella populations by 99.2% and Escherichia coli by 98.5% after 5 minutes of exposure. The findings support the use of EO water as a viable option for decontaminating fresh produce, thereby enhancing food safety and reducing the risk of foodborne illnesses.

4. Electrolyzed Water: Principles and Applications for Food Safety and Hygiene

Authors: Su, Y.C., Liu, C., and Hung, Y.C.
Journal: Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, 2007

Abstract:
This comprehensive review explores the principles and applications of electrolyzed water (EW) in food safety and hygiene. The review covers the generation of EO and ER water, their chemical properties, and their effectiveness against various pathogens. Numerous studies cited in the review demonstrate that EO water can reduce populations of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes by over 99% within a short contact time. The review underscores the potential of EW as an effective and practical solution for improving food safety across different stages of food processing and handling.

These abstracts highlight the significant reduction percentages achieved by using electrolyzed water, demonstrating its efficacy in ensuring food safety by reducing harmful bacteria and pathogens.

View our lab test results for e coli and staph removal rate here and here.

If we've been eating pesticides for decades, is it really that bad?

While pesticides have been used for decades to protect crops and increase food production, their long-term effects on human health have raised significant concerns. Numerous studies have demonstrated that chronic exposure to pesticides can have severe health implications. Below, I provide a summary of the evidence based on research findings.

1. Potential Health Effects of Pesticides – Penn State Extension

Summary: Chronic exposure to pesticides can lead to various harmful effects, including birth defects, toxicity to fetuses, the production of benign or malignant tumors, genetic changes, blood disorders, nerve disorders, and endocrine disruption.

2. Long-Term Illnesses Caused by Pesticide Exposure

Summary: Long-term, low-dose exposure to pesticides has been associated with chronic diseases such as brain tumors, lung cancer, prostate cancer, and breast cancer. The continuous accumulation of these chemicals in the body can lead to significant health risks.

3. Health Effects of Pesticides

Summary: Long-term pesticide exposure is linked to the development of Parkinson’s disease, asthma, depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The neurotoxic effects of pesticides can have profound impacts on mental health and cognitive functions.

4. Long-Term Health Effects of Pesticides – Hesperian HealthWiki

Summary: Long-term exposure to pesticides can result in memory loss, anxiety, mood changes, and difficulty concentrating. Additionally, it can damage the immune system, making individuals more susceptible to infections and diseases.

5. Exposure to Pesticides, Herbicides, & Insecticides: Human Health Effects

Summary: Pesticides are associated with both short- and long-term health effects, including elevated cancer risks and potential disruption of the body’s endocrine system. Chronic exposure can lead to significant physiological and hormonal imbalances.

  • Reference: IFM

6. Health Effects of Pesticides – Wikipedia

Summary: Strong evidence exists for long-term negative health outcomes from pesticide exposure, including increased risks of cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and reproductive disorders. The bioaccumulation of these chemicals poses ongoing risks.

7. Long- and Short-Term Health Effects of Pesticide Exposure: A Cohort Study

Summary: Long-term pesticide exposure is associated with abnormalities in nerve conduction, especially in sensory nerves. This can lead to chronic neurodegenerative conditions and impaired sensory functions.

8. Health Effects from Pesticide Exposure – AAFP

Summary: Chronic, low-level pesticide exposure is linked to significant health risks, including carcinogenicity, mutagenicity, neurotoxicity, and reproductive toxicity. These effects can manifest over extended periods, highlighting the insidious nature of pesticide-related health issues.

Conclusion

The cumulative evidence from these studies indicates that long-term exposure to pesticides can lead to severe health issues, including various cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, reproductive disorders, and hormonal disruptions. These findings underscore the importance of minimizing pesticide exposure and adopting safer agricultural practices to protect public health.

Can't I just use water to rinse my produce?

While rinsing fruits and vegetables with water is a common practice, it may not be sufficient to remove all pesticide residues or pathogens. Numerous studies have shown that water alone is often inadequate for effectively eliminating these contaminants.

Ineffectiveness of Water Alone

  1. Limited Removal of Pesticides:
    • Study: “Potential Health Effects of Pesticides – Penn State Extension”
    • Findings: Rinsing with water removes only some surface residues and does not effectively reduce pesticide levels. Pesticides that have penetrated the skin or adhered strongly to the surface are not significantly diminished by water alone.
    • Reference: Penn State Extension
  2. Inefficiency Against Pathogens:
    • Study: “Inactivation of foodborne pathogens on the surface of tomatoes by electrolyzed oxidizing water” (Kim, C., Hung, Y.C., and Brackett, R.E., Journal of Food Protection, 2000)
    • Findings: Pathogens like Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella spp. are not effectively removed by rinsing with water. In contrast, electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water achieved reductions of E. coli O157:H7 by 98.7% and Salmonella spp. by 99.1% within 10 minutes.
    • Reference: Journal of Food Protection

Superior Alternatives to Water Rinsing

  1. Electrolyzed Water:
    • Study: “Effectiveness of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water for inactivating Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella enteritidis” (Park, C.M., Hung, Y.C., and Kim, C., Journal of Food Protection, 2001)
    • Findings: EO water was found to be significantly more effective than tap water in reducing harmful bacteria. It achieved a 99.9% reduction in Listeria monocytogenes, 99.8% in Escherichia coli O157:H7, and 99.9% in Salmonella enteritidis.
    • Reference: Study Link
  2. Antimicrobial Properties:
    • Study: “Antimicrobial effect of electrolyzed oxidizing water against bacterial pathogens on fresh produce” (Allende, A., McEvoy, J., Tao, Y., Luo, Y., Food Control, 2009)
    • Findings: EO water reduced Salmonella populations by 99.2% and Escherichia coli by 98.5% after 5 minutes of exposure, proving to be a highly effective method for sanitizing fresh produce.
    • Reference: Food Control
  3. Chemical Sanitizers:
    • Study: Various studies reviewed in “Electrolyzed water: Principles and applications for food safety and hygiene” (Su, Y.C., Liu, C., and Hung, Y.C., Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, 2007)
    • Findings: Chemical sanitizers such as chlorine washes can be effective but often require high concentrations and pose health risks. Electrolyzed water provides a safer alternative with effective pathogen and pesticide reduction.
    • Reference: Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety

Conclusion

Rinsing fruits and vegetables with water can remove some surface dirt and a small percentage of pesticides and pathogens. However, studies consistently show that water alone is insufficient for thoroughly eliminating these contaminants. To ensure the safety of fresh produce, more effective methods such as using electrolyzed water are recommended. These methods have been proven to significantly reduce harmful bacteria, pathogens, and pesticide residues, thereby enhancing food safety and protecting public health.

Does it affect the nutritional value?

Electrolyzed water (both electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water and electrolyzed reducing (ER) water) has been studied for its effectiveness in removing pesticides and bacteria from fruits and vegetables. While it is an effective sanitizing method, it is important to examine whether it has any negative effects on the nutritional value of the produce.

Impact on Nutritional Value

  1. Vitamin C Retention:

    • Study: “Reduction of Pesticide Residues on Fresh Vegetables with Electrolyzed Water Treatment” (Jianxiong Hao et al.)
    • Findings: The study found that using EO or ER water to wash spinach did not affect the Vitamin C content. The Vitamin C levels remained stable after treatment with electrolyzed water, indicating that the nutritional value was preserved.
    • Reference: Study Link
  2. General Nutritional Content:

    • Study: “Electrolyzed Water: Principles and Applications for Food Safety and Hygiene” (Su, Y.C., Liu, C., and Hung, Y.C.)
    • Findings: This review concluded that electrolyzed water treatments did not significantly affect the nutritional and sensory qualities of fresh produce. Specifically, it highlighted that high doses of EO water did not negatively impact the nutritional content of fresh-cut lettuce.
    • Reference: Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety
  3. Mineral Content:

    • Study: Various studies reviewed in the context of using electrolyzed water in food safety.
    • Findings: There is no significant evidence to suggest that electrolyzed water affects the mineral content of fruits and vegetables. The primary focus of studies has been on pesticide and pathogen reduction, with minimal observed impact on nutrient levels.
    • Reference: General review of multiple studies

Negative Effects

  1. Potential Chemical Residues:

    • While electrolyzed water is effective in reducing pesticide residues, there is a need to ensure that no harmful by-products are formed during the process. The use of EO water involves the generation of hypochlorous acid, which must be managed to prevent any potential residue issues.
  2. Structural Integrity:

    • Study: “Inactivation of foodborne pathogens on the surface of tomatoes by electrolyzed oxidizing water” (Kim, C., Hung, Y.C., and Brackett, R.E.)
    • Findings: The study found no significant changes in the structural integrity of tomatoes after treatment with EO water. This indicates that the physical quality of the produce is largely maintained.
    • Reference: Journal of Food Protection
  3. Taste and Sensory Attributes:

    • There are concerns that high concentrations of electrolyzed water might alter the taste or sensory attributes of produce. However, studies have generally found that when used at appropriate concentrations, there are no significant adverse effects on taste or appearance.

Conclusion

Electrolyzed water is an effective method for removing pesticides and bacteria from fruits and vegetables without significantly affecting their nutritional value. Studies have shown that key nutrients, such as Vitamin C, remain stable after treatment, and there is no substantial impact on the mineral content or structural integrity of the produce.

While there are potential concerns about chemical residues and taste, these can be managed by using electrolyzed water at recommended concentrations. Overall, the benefits of using electrolyzed water for sanitizing fresh produce outweigh the minimal risks, making it a viable option for enhancing food safety.

What's the catch? Do I need to keep buying refills that only work with Crop DeTox?

Not at all. This is not a coffee machine/pod situation.

Everything you need to DeTox your Crops is right there already in the device.

Just keep it charged (on the wireless charging base) so it’s ready to go when you need it, and that’s it.

As long as there is water in your taps and power in your Crop DeTox, you’re set. And we do mean tap water. There are small amounts of salts found in our water that aid the electrolysis process. If you are not using tap water, check the salinity of the water you are using and consider adding salt when using your Crop DeTox.

 

The Lab Test Results for Crop DeTox